navajo_advocate
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October 19, 2014
I am extremely intrigued and curious as to what valid evidence you are so courageously basing your comment on...? In what way did Mr. Morgan leave Sage Memorial Hospital in a mess? If we are to speculate on articles that have been published, there are no actual statements indicating that Mr. Ahmad Razaghi and Mr. Morgan were working together to create the environment that Sage Memorial Hospital is currently in. But I do recall reading that Mr. Ahmad Razaghi had been hired by the Hospital's Board of Directors to be CEO. Therefore breaking any and all ties to Mr. Morgan. If we are to look at facts...Mr. Morgan has consistently had the best interest of the Navajo people, especially when it comes to Healthcare. If you claim to know Mr. Morgan so well...I dare you to read every article that has his name in it. I also dare you to question USU-CEU what criteria they used, and what justified their actions when honoring Mr. Morgan with a Honorary Doctorates for his work to advance education and healthcare in San Juan County.
Public Notice - Election Equipment Demo
Oct 16, 2014 | 386 views | 0 0 comments | 3 3 recommendations | email to a friend | print
Public Notice - Election Equipment Demo Notice is hereby given that the General Election will be held in San Juan County, Utah, on Tuesday, November 4, 2014. All eligible registered voters in San Juan County, Utah, have been sent an absentee (Vote By-Mail) ballot. The San Juan County Clerks Office will be open from 7:00 AM to 8:00 PM on Election Day for those who have not received their ballot in the mail or need assistance. Notice is hereby given that there will not be an EARLY VOTING location for the the General Election. THERE WILL BE NO precinct based POLLING LOCATIONS ON ELECTION DAY. Notice is also given that the County Commission will Canvass the General Election Returns at 12:00 Noon on November 17th in the Commission Chambers at 117 South Main, Monticello, Utah. There will be a public L&A test and demonstration of the Optical Scab Voting Equipment, which will be used in the November 4th by-mail General Election, at the County Clerks office in the County Administration Building, in Monticello, Utah, at 10:00 AM on October 17th. Anyone interested in participating is welcome to attend. Norman L. Johnson Clerk/Auditor Publishing: San Juan Record, PO Box 879, Monticello, Utah 84535, October 15, 2014
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rjnoonan
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October 15, 2014
excellent presentation; very nice writing style as well; fed govt, where do they get these people?
Open houses for public lands proposals
Oct 15, 2014 | 787 views | 0 0 comments | 3 3 recommendations | email to a friend | print
The future of public lands will be the focus of a series of meetings as San Juan County moves into the next phase in the process of creating a recommendation for the Bishop Public Lands Bill. Congressmen Rob Bishop and Jason Chaffetz are sponsoring a bill, which they hope may help settle some of the controversies regarding federal land. Many of the public land controversies have swirled in the area for decades. A series of public meetings are planned in coming weeks to discuss some of the proposals submitted by various groups. Three recommendations generated by a San Juan County public lands council will have particular focus at the meeting. Meetings will be held at Monument Valley High School on Monday, October 27; at the Blanding Arts and Events Center on October 28; at the Bluff Community Center on October 29; at the Aneth Chapter House on November 3; at Monticello High School on November 5; and at the La Sal Community Center on November 6. All meetings begin at 7 p.m. The public lands council was made up of a cross-section of county residents. They met several times over the course of the year and completed a number of visits to areas of interest. A number of county residents served as Land Council members, including Brent Johansen, Grayson Redd, Heidi Redd, Josh Ewing, Vaughn Hadenfeldt, Mark Maryboy, Shane Shumway, Marie Holiday, Shaye Holiday, Stefnee Turk, Steve Deeter, Todd Westcott, and Tim Chamberlain. Commissioner Phil Lyman served as leader of the group.  County employees John Fellmeth and Nick Sandberg attended as advisors and technical staff. The three alternatives vary in the amount of public land that would be set aside for special designation. The first alternative, which was a unanimous choice by all members of the Lands Council, calls for the designation of 505,823 acres of BLM ground for wilderness. The wilderness land would include 219,507 acres of Cedar Mesa Wilderness, and portions of Mancos Mesa, Mikes Canyon, Steer Gulch, Mule Canyon, Dark Canyon, Butler Wash, Cross Canyon, Bridger Jack Mesa, Indian Creek and Behind the Rocks. An additional 566,798 acres would be designated as National Conservation Areas (NCA) in the first alternative. Two separate NCAs are recommended, including 468,832 acres on Cedar Mesa and 97,966 acres in Indian Creek. In total, the Lands Council recommended a Wilderness or NCA designation for 1,072,621 acres of public land in San Juan County. The second alternative, which was agreed by a majority of the Lands Council members, adds 20,930 acres to the Cedar Mesa NCA and 2,823 acres to the Indian Creek NCA. The total acreage recommended for Wilderness or NCA designation in the second alternative is 1,096,374 acres. The third alternative, which is supported by a few members of the Lands Council, added 54,749 acres of wilderness and 253,796 acres of NCAs, including 21,954 acres for a Beef Basin NCA. This alternative recommends significant increases (223,895 acres) to the Cedar Mesa NCA. In total, the third alternative would designate more than one million acres of contiguous acres for protection in central San Juan County, stretching from Recapture Pocket to Glen Canyon. The total acreage recommended for wilderness or NCA designation in the third alternative is 1,404,919 acres. By comparison, the proposed Greater Canyonlands National Monument calls for the designation of 991,982 acres in San Juan County. The Red Rock Wilderness Bill calls for the designation of 1,453,728 acres in San Juan County. Maps outlining the recommendations are available at the meeting and the San Juan County website at sanjuancounty.org.
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Recapture Canyon, truth and lies
Oct 15, 2014 | 962 views | 1 1 comments | 3 3 recommendations | email to a friend | print
Is It Just Me?by Joe B. LymanPrevailing media reports on Recapture Canyon all regurgitate the same misinformation and outright lies that have been perpetrated by activist environmentalists and the BLM.   In order for readers to get the other side of this story I will present a summary of several myths about Recapture.  This is part one of three parts. Archaeology; Archaeology is the current weapon of choice by those who seek to deny access.  While no right thinking person condones wanton destruction of archaeology sites the truth of what is going on is much different than what we are being told.   Recapture Canyon has been a major thoroughfare for centuries and despite recent history of cattle ranching, mining, oil exploration, recreation and so on the sites remain.  Part of the road that was ‘closed temporarily’ nearly 8 years ago is actually a county road and right of way for a pipeline that was put in along with the dam construction in the 80s. No Canyon in Utah has had more archaeology analysis than Recapture Canyon. Every visitor to Blanding drives through Recapture Canyon on the dam completed in 1985. The placer mining which was permitted underwent a significant archaeological clearance. When the road was realigned in the 1990’s additional clearances were performed. If all it takes to completely shut down a community is to cry archaeology, then every acre of Utah is at the mercy of outside wilderness enterprises whose business model thrives on emotion, fed by lies. Breaking the Law; All the clamor about the recent protest ride is over the lawbreakers riding the trail.  In reality, the authority of the BLM to close the road at all is in question. What is not in question is whether they have violated numbers of their own rules.  The BLM is clearly in violation of a number of laws and rules.  So how can it be illegal to ride a trail closed illegally? Phil Lyman is a County Commissioner, elected by the people of San Juan County to safeguard their health, safety, culture, and general welfare. His willingness to stand up to a clear violation on the part of the BLM of their own laws and rules, is not a criminal action. The protest held on May 9th and 10th did not violate any laws. The BLM, the Highway Patrol, the Sheriff, the media, and the public were all invited to express their frustration with a federal agency that has placed themselves above the law, above the County, and above the people who are peaceably trying to exist here. Conspiracy; The charges against The Five include conspiracy, which is a secret plan by a group to do something unlawful or harmful.  The idea for the ride came about in public meetings and was advertised to any and all with special invitation to BLM officers and nothing was harmed.  The charge of conspiracy is therefore groundless. This was an ATV Rally; Not really.  Although ATV enthusiasts are understandably concerned about the actions of the BLM in recent years the rally was about a continued pattern of abusive behavior by the BLM toward local citizens including a history of heavily armed raids.   The fact that this road was closed temporarily over eight years ago has brought these issues into focus in Recapture Canyon but it is not the story, just a part of it. The story in Recapture encapsulates so much of what is wrong with big oppressive government. More on big oppressive government next week.
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rjnoonan
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October 15, 2014
excellent presentation; very nice writing style as

well; fed govt, where do they get these people?
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