Wasatch Wind discusses impact of proposed wind farm
May 01, 2013 | 2116 views | 3 3 comments | 22 22 recommendations | email to a friend | print
Wasatch Wind has developed a concept of how a proposed wind farm would look from Monticello.  This photo, with superimposed wind turbines, is from 200 West near the Monticello LDS Temple.  Courtesy photo and graphics
Wasatch Wind has developed a concept of how a proposed wind farm would look from Monticello. This photo, with superimposed wind turbines, is from 200 West near the Monticello LDS Temple. Courtesy photo and graphics
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Representatives from Wasatch Wind discussed their proposed wind farm at an Open House held concurrently with the Monticello City Council meeting on April 23.

According to Wasatch Wind representative Julie Mack, the purpose of the event was the help local residents visualize the impact of the wind farm on the Monticello area.

Prior public meetings regarding the proposed wind farm were sometimes contentious. There were few public comments in opposition to the project on April 23

Mack explained that the company has made a number of accommodations that may explain the possible decrease in opposition to the project. They include moving the location of a number of the massive wind turbines in response to public concern.

In addition, negotiations have progressed with a group of landowners that owned property within the proposed wind farm. Several of the landowners were previous employees of the groups developing the project.

Wasatch Wind is proposing a 27-turbine wind farm immediately north and west of Monticello City limits. The closest turbine to residences in the city would be more than one mile away.

Mack explained that a second open house in June would include additional simulations and information regarding sound impacts, construction impacts and environmental impact.

Mack said the group hopes to sign formal agreements in June and begin construction in the Fall of 2013. After a busy construction phase, the project would bring four to six permanent jobs to the community.

Mack explained that the towers generally have a functional life of about 20 years, while the lease agreements with land owners are 40 to 50 years.

There is expected to be temporary hunting restrictions on the land during the construction phase, but long term access to the land will be up to the private property owners.
Comments
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kmartis
|
May 27, 2013
What are the impacts of industrial wind development?

See and hear for yourself:

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=3Q4cJ0m821g

Kevon Martis

Director

www.iiccusa.org
outback
|
May 05, 2013
Damage to Raptors...

http://www.spectator.co.uk/features/8807761/wind-farms-vs-wildlife/
outback
|
May 04, 2013
Wind Farms, not the best idea...

http://www.uticaod.com/news/x1292891329/60-Herkimer-County-residents-sue-owner-of-wind-farm
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