It was a grand Fourth
Jul 11, 2012 | 1878 views | 0 0 comments | 12 12 recommendations | email to a friend | print
For the second year in a row, Diamond C Fuels beat Native Guns in the final of the Midnight Madness softball tourney on July 4 in Blanding.  A total of 22 teams participated in the annual tournament. Members of the winning team include: Front row (left to right) Simone Shumway, L’sha Eldredge, Brooke Lyman, Gina Smith, Jessica Heaton.  Back: Zac Christensen, Dylan Richmond, Logan Meyer, Barkley Christensen, and Justin Nielson.  CallieJo Christensen photo
For the second year in a row, Diamond C Fuels beat Native Guns in the final of the Midnight Madness softball tourney on July 4 in Blanding. A total of 22 teams participated in the annual tournament. Members of the winning team include: Front row (left to right) Simone Shumway, L’sha Eldredge, Brooke Lyman, Gina Smith, Jessica Heaton. Back: Zac Christensen, Dylan Richmond, Logan Meyer, Barkley Christensen, and Justin Nielson. CallieJo Christensen photo
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SPORTS SHORTS
by Scott Boyle

The Fourth is over, sadly, but one to remember, what with two long prayed for rains to cool off parade goers and to put out any raging fires immediately after another fine display of fireworks at Centennial Park. 

Other than the lack of shade, Centennial Park is a nice place to handle all the people for all the festivities of the day.

Diamond C Fuels owned the diamond for the second year in a row as they claimed the Midnight Madness Softball tournament. They defeated the Native Guns in the championship game early Wednesday morning.

Claiming the championship in the Independence Day volleyball tournament is Team Kohona Holly. Team Kara Shumway finishes second, followed by Team Ivins.

The three on three basketball tournament was another success.

The winning team in the 17 and up category includes AJ Slavens, Dalin Shumway, David Anderson, and Shea Swenson.

Winners in the age 13 to 16 category are Kade Palmer, Trason Jack, Devon Johnson, Tyrel Pemberton and his cousin Kyle.

The 12 and under competition was claimed by Jaden Torgerson, Kean Poyer, Jaxon Torgerson and Ryan Imlay.

• • • • •

Back in Monticello at the Hideout, Baerbel Hehnke, of Lambsheim, Germany, is the latest golfer to hit a hole in one at the Hideout Golf Club. 

Hehnke hit a six iron into the cup on the third hole on June 27.  She golfs the Hideout at least once a year for the past four years and was lucky enough to make an ace this year. 

The shot was witnessed by her husband.  A big thehnks to the Hehnkes for coming all the way from Germany to play the Hideout.

• • • • •

Last week, Sportshorts predicted that one of the Rs, Rafael or Roger, would win Wimbledon.  I guess I guessed right as Roger won his seventh title. 

I had to laugh as people commented on Federer’s age, 30, and talking about him being over the hill.  He proved them all wrong and won one for us old guys! 

And guess who is leading le Tour de France... but Bradley Wiggins, whom Sportshorts also predicted would win, not for his ability mind you, but for the way his name rolls off the tongue. 

When I say “Bradley Wiggins”, I can hear Tim Conway on the old Carol Burnett show “Tudball and Mrs. Wiggins” comedy bits, talking with “ameessesa Wigginza”. You can watch on YouTube.

• • • • •

Are you looking for a little vacation this summer?  You might try riding the “California Zephyr”, the AmTrac train from Green River to Denver and back. 

I did just that not too long ago and what a stimulating trip that is.  When you couple it with a Rockies baseball game, you’ve got a delightful two or three day excursion. 

The Zephyr takes one through some of the most beautiful country in Colorado.  After leaving Green River, somewhere just past Cisco, the Zephyr drops down along the spectacular Colorado River into Ruby Canyon, an area only assessable by train or river raft.  More on the river rafters in a moment. 

The train then follows the Colorado River for some 240 miles, nearly to its head, high in the Rockies.  The scenery is spectacular and I lost count of the number of bald eagles, great blue herons, elk, antelope, deer, golf courses, and full moons we encountered. 

The full moons would be the Zephyr salutes, which river runners would offer up as the Zephyr passed by.  I preferred the bald eagles, personally. 

We boarded the train in Green River at about 8 a.m. and got in Denver about 6 p.m. In between was the most whimsical journey.  There is a dining car on the train, which serves breakfast, lunch, and dinner by appointment. 

Soon after boarding in Green River, we found ourselves in the dining car, though disappointingly we were unable to dine on the signature California Zephyr French toast as it wasn’t on the menu this journey. 

But I enjoyed the pancakes and sausage breakfast and the conversation with three other people I had never met before; a couple from New Zealand on a six week train tour of the United States and an art teacher at a community college in California, on her way to Taos, NM to spend the summer painting. 

The porters and waiters were most helpful on the train, chatty and witty and fun.  One waiter, with a heavy accent from some eastern European country I think, had an unusual way of greeting people when they came into the diner.  “What’s wrong?” he would ask. 

At first people didn’t quite know how to answer, they didn’t have a problem, they just wanted to eat.  Then, when he would ask again, folks would realize what he meant was “Can I help you?”   

And dining while traveling down the road, not with one dazed hand on the steering wheel and the other clenching a Baconator, but calmed, relaxed, surrounded by stimulating conversation, pleasant companionship and gorgeous scenery is quite the soothing experience. 

“There’s something civilized about dining while traveling” one traveling companion noted.  I concur completely.

After leaving Grand Junction, the train passes through canyon after canyon.  At the head of the Colorado River, you pass through Byers Canyon, the scenic Tabernash Valley and the towns of Granby and Fraser, high in the alpine valleys of the Rockies. Then you enter a long six mile tunnel. When you exit, the river is suddenly heading in the other direction and has become the South Platte, I believe.
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